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Title Living with the 'Woods'
Cartoonist Earle Wright with David McGill
Publishers BDM Publications, Edinburgh, Scotland
First published 1984
ISBN None
Edition reviewed 1st
Hardback/softback Softback
List price Not known
Cover size (cm)
(height x width)
16.0 x 25.0
Number of pages 96
Number of pages with Coloured photos Black & white photos Line drawings
  None None 86 (cartoon stories)
Synopsis Nearly every Saturday evening for the past 34 years, readers of the Edinburgh 'Green' Dispatch and 'Pink' News have been entertained by the 'Fitba' Daft' and 'Bowling Green' cartoons. Such is the skill and imagination that their creator, Earle Wright, brings to his ageless characters 'Big Eck' and 'Wee Bob', you confidently expect to find them alive and well on the local bowling green, or the terracing at Tynecastle Park or Easter Road in Edinburgh, arguing about the merits of their respective teams, Hearts and Hibs.

In this new series of cartoons, Earle has applied that same accuracy of detail and sense of humour to bring life to his 'wooden' subjects. By giving bowls the chance to say something about us, the players, he helps to sustain that spirit of fun which is so essential for the continued well-being of our game. Earle Wright is a retired civil servant. An all-round sportsman, he took up bowls late in life, and is an active and enthusiastic member of the Carricknowe Bowling Club in Edinburgh.

David McGill is a practising architect and has played bowls as a member of the Sighthill Bowling Club in Edinburgh for 20 years. He first represented Scotland in 1974 and was the British Isles Singles Champion in 1977. In 1978 he represented his country in the Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, and in the 1980 World Bowls Championships in Melbourne when he won a bronze medal in the singles and a silver in the triples. A popular figure wherever he played, he is well known throughout the bowling world for his sense of humour and his imaginative views on the future of the game.


Also by Earle Wright: