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Title Winning Bowls
Editor Clarence Medlycott Jones
Publisher Stanley Paul & Co Ltd, London
First published 1965
ISBN Pre-ISBN system
Edition reviewed 1st
Hardback/softback Hardback
List price 18s 0d (90p)
Cover size (cm)
(height x width)
21.5 x 13.5
Number of pages 144
Number of pages with Coloured photos Black & white photos Line drawings
  None 12 8
Synopsis England 1, South Africa 2, Scotland 3, Ireland 4, Australia 5: that is the world ranking of the top five countries where bowls is played, given by Clarence Medlycott Jones, in this challenging book.

In analysing the reasons which make England pre-eminent in bowls, while so inferior in nearly every other game, he has the support of some of the men who have put England in that supreme position. Men like David Bryant, who dominated the 1962 Commonwealth and Empire Games, Tom Flemming, who teamed with Bryant in winning one gold medal, Norman King, gold medallist at the 1958 Empire Games, Percy Baker, four times English champion, Peter Brimble, the brilliant young England international and Gareth Humphreys, an even younger Welshman and winner of the British Isles Fours Championship in 1963. All contribute chapters on the game.

Because these giants of the bowling world outline in detail their individual attitudes towards bowls and their resulting systems for playing and improving, it might be thought that this leads to slight overlapping. But who among bowlers can fail to profit from comparing the aggressive attitude of, say, Brimble with the scientific approach of Bryant, the philosophical outlook of Humphreys and the par-golf system adopted by Flemming?

Experience, too, is immeasurable. It has often been said that no-one ever benefits from the experience of others, but this book does not support this theory. So it incorporates perhaps the most vivid chapter ever to appear in a bowls book, an outline of the greatest ends ever played by a score of the world's greatest players.


Also by Clarence Medlycott Jones: